Campus News

Reducing sickle cell mortality rates

UNC Project-Malawi has received a $500,000 grant to improve capacity for sickle cell care and research to treat children in Malawi.

Families wait outside the sickle cell clinic at Kamuzu Central Hospital in Lilongwe, Malawi
Families wait outside the sickle cell clinic at Kamuzu Central Hospital in Lilongwe, Malawi. (Image courtesy of the UNC School of Medicine)

A team of researchers led by UNC Project-Malawi has received a one-year, $500,000 grant to build clinical and research capacity in Malawi to better diagnose and treat children with sickle cell disease. The funding is a joint award from the NIH’s National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute and National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

“The mortality rates for sickle cell disease and HIV is unacceptably high in sub-Saharan Africa,” says Irving Hoffman, international director of UNC Project-Malawi, who led development of the grant request. “We want to build clinical and research systems that will set the stage to reduce mortality rates, including eventual gene therapy for both diseases.”

Read more about how the project is providing care to children in Malawi.