Carolina People

Carolina People: Monica Hill

What does Monica Hill like best about her job supporting scholastic journalism throughout North Carolina? Working with great people, of course. "I have the advantage of working with the best philanthropists in education because high school journalism teachers give so much to students," she said.

The Campaign for Carolina continues with a $10 million gift from alumni Bill and Anne Harrison.

 

 

 

 

Monica Hill 

DIRECTOR OF THE NORTH CAROLINA SCHOLASTIC MEDIA ASSOCIATION, SCHOOL OF MEDIA AND JOURNALISM

17 years working at Carolina

 

WHAT’S A TYPICAL DAY LIKE IN YOUR JOB?

As with most people working in outreach, no day is typical. For example, one morning, I might arrive early to unlock the lab for teachers here for our NCSMA Journalism Education fellowship program. They’ll take a graduate-level course in scholastic journalism education, and then I will join them to discuss scholastic journal- ism resources. In the afternoon, I might present a session on newswriting style to 12 students in the Chuck Stone program, “Diversity in Education and Media.”

HOW DOES YOUR WORK SUPPORT CAROLINA’S MISSION?

We provide our services and outreach to students and teachers all across the state. We celebrate the work of high school yearbooks, literary magazines, newspapers, online news and broadcast students through our annual statewide contests. Our goal is to elevate the role of journalism education by promoting honors journalism credits for students, and to support the professional development of the K-12 teachers involved in journalism education.

WHAT DO YOU LIKE MOST ABOUT YOUR WORK?

I work with great people. I have the advantage of working with the best philanthropists in education because high school journalism teachers give so much to students. They teach students how to express themselves and how to serve their school communities. And they also take time to process forms and reserve transportation for field trips. Then I have the advantage of meeting their students. It’s terrific to see a high school student on a college campus for the first time.

HOW DID YOU BECOME THE DIRECTOR OF NCSMA?

I was a product of scholastic journalism. My high school journalism teacher was willing to make opportunities available to students. She arranged for a group to attend the Alabama Scholastic Press Association convention, and I was hooked. I pursued journalism and education studies in college and grad school, and I became director of the Alabama association. Then I found myself here, and I was hired by a former director of NCSMA.

HOW MUCH HAVE YOU SEEN HIGH SCHOOL JOURNALISM CHANGE SINCE YOU’VE HAD THIS JOB?

Scholastic journalism is at once vastly changed, yet steadfast. Yearbooks remain the most prominent form of student media in our schools. Now schools have fewer newspapers, many opting for news magazines and inter- active media. Literary magazines continue to honor our state’s rich literary tradition and are an important part of the association.

 

Carolina People is a regular feature in each issue of the Gazette that asks one of your fascinating colleagues five questions about the work they do for the University. Do you know someone with an interesting or unique job at Carolina? Please email your suggestions to gazette@unc.edu and put Carolina People in the subject line.